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There’s a New Kid on the Block and they could change everything. Interview with Bob McNulty of TripDelivers

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logo for TripDelivers, a new delivery company.
TripDelivers is a new delivery company that just launched its first market in Nashville

Ron at EntreCourier

Well, Courier Nation, I’m excited to have our guest on today. I have Bob McNulty from TripDelivers. TripDelivers is a new entrant coming into the delivery scene and really kinda upending things with a totally different model and a totally different approach both for the restaurants and for the drivers.

Everything that I’m seeing on it is it looks like it’s more of a true independent contractor model. Almost not even a contractor, but it’s that they’re going to be working with us as drivers in a way that is much more like being like an actual business owner than kinda that pseudo half employee half contractor thing that you see with a lot of these others on here. So, Bob, I want to thank you for coming on and joining us today and for telling us about TripDelivers.

Bob McNulty from Trip Delivers

Well, I appreciate you inviting me, Ron. It’s a pleasure to talk with you. You seem to know the industry and you really know the business.

Ron

Well, I at least like to act like it. I’m not sure if I know as much or if I just talk like it. Bob, tell us a little about what you’re doing with TripDelivers, you just got launched I think in Nashville, and are looking at other markets as well, but just kinda tell us, give us an overview of what you’re doing and how you got started and why you decided to dive into this market.

Bob

Yeah, it’s a really crazy story about how I got into this space. It wasn’t by design, I can tell you that. I was visiting my son in LA and I spent the night with him and he and I had an appointment in Beverly Hills that morning, but he had to drop his car off in Van Nuys to get it fixed. I like to be on time, I don’t like to be late to meetings and things, and we had to drive through traffic and from Beverly Hills to Van Nuys can take anywhere from thirty, forty minutes to an hour.

So I said to him, the night before, don’t forget to get us a town car and have them take us up there so we don’t have to worry about getting there on time. He said yeah, no worries. So we’re at the dealership and he’s dropping his car off, and I figured they’d have to pick us up, like call at eight o’clock in the morning or something. I said to my son, is that car going to be there, because usually the car is there before you’re there. And he says oh, yeah, don’t worry about a thing.

And about five minutes later I said, do you think that car is going to be here. And he says, yeah, Dad, let me show you.  He breaks out his phone, and he says, you see that little car moving? I go yeah, I thought it was a game when I first saw it. I go yeah, and he says, that car is going to pull up in about five seconds, and I said you’re kidding. Because it was on the spot where we’re supposed to, on the curb. And sure enough this car pulls up. And then we get in, and then you get out, and you don’t have to pay and don’t have to get money out of your pocket and you’re frumping around trying to get to a meeting and stuff. So that was my first introduction and I was blown away, because at the end of the meeting, before the meeting was over, he also put it in to get a car.

So we got done with the meeting, walked downstairs, and there was a car pulling up. So now I had two great experiences with Uber. But I had no idea, no idea I was ever going to go into this space. And then, over time I started using Uber and Lyft and over time it’s the same, you know, you get in the car and how are you , what’s going on, how long you been driving, how is it, what’s the big boogeyman stuff, and it was the same thing. I took thirty forty rides and it was the same thing. “We’re not respected, we don’t make any money, we work our buns off, you know, all the things that you hear.

And then I just started thinking about it, I started doing research about different companies like Lyft, Uber, and saw some of the stuff off shore in Asia and Europe. I’m thinking, geez, there’s gotta be a better way to do this. If these guys aren’t really making money, and they’re not respected, then that translates into consumers, and they’re not going to like it because they got a disgruntled guy driving and all they’re doing is railing on the company.

So that’s how I kind of got into this space, but it took me over two years before I made a decision to go in it. Because I’d do research, never research to think about going into the business, just research to kind of understand the gig economy, because I wasn’t really familiar with it, in the way they were talking about it.

And then, just one day, I said God, there’s gotta be a better way to do it, and this is when I came up with the model that we’re using today.

You know, we were going to launch back in January, just before Covid, and immediately you could see all the numbers going south on rideshare, and I said no, we’ve gotta pivot over to grocery, because I knew a bit about the grocery space. Not very much on the restaurant side but the grocery side I know pretty well.

So I said let’s make that pivot over, and we reshuffled our deck on the software and put that plan into work, and now we’re in the delivery business. And I think we’re going to really like it. One is, it’s probably the most profitable business in rideshare if you do it right, in my opinion. It’s got a lower cost of operating because you’re not paying the exorbitant insurance costs, all the things you have to pay on the rideshare side.

You know, it’s kind of interesting how you can get into a space not knowing anything about it, because you spent so much time researching it and talking to people, how you start to feel about the business and the industry itself, I really like it. I think it’s exciting, I think it’s got a huge upside from the standpoint of not just groceries and restaurants as I was saying a little bit ago, but on the general merchandise side.

There was a deal with Instacart announced just yesterday, they’re dealing with Best Buy, so they’re going to do pick, pack and ship orders or they’ll be in the stores, doing that kind of stuff. So, the innovation that’s coming out of this is kind of interesting. Everyone is going down their own track.

We could be in the Instacart business, we have it built into our system, we just elected not to do it.

Ron

Start off, it sounds like you’re starting off with restaurant delivery, and then you’ll eventually move into retail delivery if it looks like there’s a good opening later on?

Bob

We’re going to do restaurant now, probably in the next 120 days we’ll start rolling into groceries and then ultimately into the retail system itself.

One of the things that’s most interesting, if you look at the numbers, the grocery business and the restaurant business is almost two trillion dollars in the United States. It’s almost ten percent of the GDP in the United States.

The other thing that most people don’t know is that the retail sector, Best Buy, Home Depot, all these Walmarts, that’s another three trillion, three and a half trillion business out there. If that goes the way where deliveries become more prevalent to use, because I know where, one of the things is my wife is an avid Amazon user. We probably get an order a day, I’m not kidding.

So I was going to go to Home Depot to get some Rose food, because we have roses around here, and now it’s cooling down, the roses are blooming and coming back, you know, when it’s hot they wither up. So I told her I’m going to go to Home Depot to get some rose food and she said nah, don’t do that, let me order it, because we have Prime. I said okay, and she ordered it, it’s convenient.

But yeah, so the convenience side, it’s extraordinarily great but what you have to balance out is the convenience side and the pricing side so it doesn’t get overly priced so people don’t use it as a convenience. And that’s why Amazon does so well because even though their price is whatever, two hundred bucks, I don’t even know what it is for Prime now, but they’ve been able to balance it out because they’ve got a great service, you know, two day or whatever next day.

Ron

I ordered something this morning that’s coming in today.

Bob

Yeah, see, that’s what’s crazy, isn’t it? Same day, so what’s going to happen though, and I think with Instacart doing a deal, and I think it will work out, I don’t know what the numbers are. But now you’re back to convenience, big time, at Best Buy, because I could buy something today and it’ll probably arrive in the next hour or two hours. Whatever it might be. So they pick it, they pack it, somebody delivers it, you’ve got it the same day, so it’s gonna compete with Amazon at some point.

The point of contention is how close, and this is where Amazon’s been brilliant, is how close they are to their customer. Like you said, I ordered it this morning, I got it this afternoon. Their strategic thinking and how they run their delivery service, which is logistics, these guys are as good as anybody on the planet.

But that’s, it all gets back around to the same stuff. How great a marketer are you, do you have cost controls over your business, do you have a business model that works, all those kinds of things.

Ron

Since you mention business model, you’ve got a really interesting one. You’re not kind of another me too delivery company. Everybody out there is doing, we’re going to charge the restaurant thirty percent and we’re going to charge the customer twenty percent and we’re going to give the drivers three bucks.

You’re doing a totally different approach, so why don’t you tell us a little about how your’e structuring everything?

Bob

Yeah, so basically on the restaurant side, which is really interesting, we’re using a referral business. So, if you go out and sign up a restaurant, then you participate in referral income or residual income as every delivery through a trip driver picks up, you earn 40 cents  yourself.

So if somebody is really enterprise and they say you know, I want to make some extra money, all I gotta do is go sign up twenty or thirty restaurans, and if they’re getting ten or twenty orders a day through TripDelivery, I make 40 cents on all of them. So that’s a great way to make some

Ron

Think about that, that’s crazy. I just think about this, that I walk into a restaurant and there’s ten orders waiting, that’s four bucks for somebody.

Bob

Exactly. And somebody has gone to sign the restaurant, you went to the effort to sign them up, you get all that income on the 40 cent side.

What people in our business don’t understand yet is that also, most these restaurants have two thousand, three thousand followers. Doesn’t mean they’re always in the store at the same time, we’re going to teach the restaunteur to send out the app to their customers, and then they’ll make money every time their customer comes in too. So it’s kind of like a win win for people.

We just took a very complex business, meaning rideshare in general or restaurant business, and tried to look at it from a simplistic view. And the thing is, we actually have like three customers. We have the driver who’s a customer who’s a customer, we have the restaurant who’s a customer, and then we have the customer of the restaurant who’s the end user as a customer. We have to understand all three components to market them smartly. And that’s why we use a referral based business, and that will start getting traction as we build the business.

Ron

And that’s an interesting way to do it. My son in law, right before he married my step daughter, had been managing a restaurant in another town, he talked about the problem that he faces was that he was maybe breaking even on deliveries. That kind of makes it hard to really push deliveries. How is that different for you guys? I mean, if he’s paying twenty to thirty percent out, to Uber Eats Grubhub or anything like that?

Bob

Yeah, ours is a flat fee. Two dollars or three dollars. If you become a member with us, like a prime member if you think of it that way, you’re going to pay two dollars if you’re a restaurant to pick it up and deliver it. If you’re a non member it’s three bucks to pick it up.

So it’s pretty easy. Again, we know what revenue’s coming in every time a car picks up an order, we know that 40 cents goes here, ten cents goes there, the rest goes to the company, so we just have to make sure we’ve got enough going on at all these restaurants so that we can make money.

So even then, If you take it more in a bigger picture, let’s say we had a hundred thousand cars out in a day, and it’s working. In the US it wouldn’t be unlikely you could have a hundred thousand cars on the road. So if you said, on the average there was eight or ten pickups. So let’s say it’s ten, that’s twenty dollars a day per car, and a hundred thousand cars.

That’s a serious amount of money. We could capture top line. The other thing we don’t do that all the other ride or delivery companies, by marking it up twenty percent or thirty percent, and they take control of that money. The order goes through them, they run it on their card processing. They take control of 100% of that money. Their top line, they’re booking all of that revenue, that income, okay?

So, us, we only book the two dollars. So our business model is a lot simpler. But that two dollars is almost all margin for us, right? So it’s a whole different way of accounting for what’s transacting in your business. The revenues may be lower by significant numbers on a gross basis but the earnings will be there and drive the business.

Ron

So what you’ve got there is you’ve got the restaurant just paying the three dollar fee, they get the total amount of whatever is charged to the customer, outside of that three dollar fee, there’s no big commission on top of that or anything like that.

Bob

So what happens is, we issue the restaurant their own merchant account, and then they get an order, the order actually goes through our system but not the money. The money goes into their pocketbook and it’s seamless because they’ll get their money the same day. They don’t have to wait four or five days for the delivery company that controls the whole transaction, because we have, just think of it his way. It’s a freeway. The money is going down the freeway and there’s an exit that says two dollars, and another that says three dollars. The system knows if you’re a two dollar or three dollar person. And it just sends us our money as it’s going down the freeway, and the rest goes into the restaunteur’s bank account.

Ron

Okay, now how does that work for the driver then? Since most of my audience is obviously couriers

Bob

Yeah, so the driver gets, there’s still a delivery fee for the consumer, and that delivery fee is time, distance, cancellation, wait time and then the tip. So we have to be very smart about how we price that because we don’t want to price it so cheap that it hurts the driver, but you don’t want to price it so high that it hurts the consumer, so you have to look at that.

But we think on average a driver will pick up probably seven, eight bucks for delivery not counting the tip. So if you’re thinking ten, eleven, twelve bucks, the good news is some of our research shows that maybe it’s not that way, but usually if you get an order that’s thirty five, fifty bucks, the person that’s actually ordered it is pretty generous on the tipping side, so fifteen twenty percent on the tip.

Ron

One thing that I’ve noticed, something that you mentioned about the way that works, is that sounds like what the customer is paying, what the driver gets paid is based directly on what the customer is paying. Did I get that correct?

Bob

Right. He gets a hundred percent of the fare.

Ron

See, that’s very different than what we get with Grubhub or Doordash or Uber Eats. What we’re paid has nothing to do at all with what the other company is paid. Which is interesting

Bob

I think that, what we found is because of the pricing models that everybody else uses, they kinda play hide the football. So the driver doesn’t know what the end result is, the total fare, so there’s a lot of miscommunications. And then you see what you were just talking about where you see a fifty cent fee for this and two dollars for that, you know, it’s kinda banged you all over the place and there’s no transparency. Our receipts are transparent so the driver, rider, or the person that bought the food and the restaurant all see the same receipt. There’s no hidden nothing. You see it all.

That’s what we found in our research that really upset drivers, that they just couldn’t see the number.

Ron

Absolutely correct. That transparency will make you their best friend right away, it really would.

You know, there’s an interesting thing I noticed that, when it comes to our taxes, usually we get a 1099 from everybody. Uber Eats is the one difference, where they use a 1099-K which they try and make it look like they’re acting like the processor where they just kind of facilitating this transaction between the customer and the driver and they’re kind of more of a middleman but the problem is their delivery fees never line up with what we’re paid, so it’s all, it’s showmanship. It’s designed to make it look like it’s a distant transaction for misclassification purposes but it’s not real. It sounds like what you’re doing is actually real. What they’re paying is actually what we’re getting.

Bob

Yeah. We do everything in real time numbers. It’s not that if the fare is ten bucks, we show every line item on the fare. Since we don’t deal with the food costs, we don’t have any food costs, we don’t show that. But we’ll show it’s either a two dollar or three dollar, because it’s on the same line item, so the restauranteur can see it, the consumer can see it, the driver can see it. That way they don’t think about geez, did I just get screwed for five bucks? Because that was one of the things that I heard almost in every conversation, we don’t know what we really make. They say it’s this but I found it’s this, and that leads to your driver who’s the backbone of your business to be upset or disgruntled, lack of faith in who’s paying them, and that needs to be addressed. That was the first thing we saw, you’ve gotta have transparency. You can’t keep people in the dark and think they’re going to be happy campers. They may have a fifty dollar delivery, a sixty dollar delivery, and they don’t even know what it is.

Ron

Yeah, and I think I hear it from really all sides, drivers and customers, the restaurants, and the only one that really knows what’s going on is the delivery company.

Bob

Exactly. Here’s the thing: The delivery companies, like I got into a whole discussion of marking up menus, and how we were going to handle menus as opposed to other people, and I asked a number of our own people, and I said, why do you think they handle the menus like they handle them? And I was shocked, even our people couldn’t, well, they just want to mark up the menus. I said no, it’s a profit center for them, they not only want to mark it up, they want to control it. And if they have that kind of control, now they can control the restaurant.

They can tell the restaurant, because they’re fearful of losing business particularly in covid time, because every dollar counts that goes to the restaurant, right? And they want to control their business. And then essentially, they’re giving up their own freedom to run their business. They’re being dictated to by these very large companies, the small businesses, mom and pops, they don’t have a lot of choices. That’s the problem.

They’re saying over two hundred thousand restaurants will close this full year will close, or will never reopen.

Ron

Well, and it sounds like it could get worse. Colorado just amped things up again, and their going to shut down restaurants again for in seat dining.

Bob

That’s going to kill them.

Ron

It is. Some of these places that struggled to open up, and now they have to close down again. I hate it, especially the mom and pop places.

Bob

The chains can handle it, they’ve got deep pockets, most of them. So they don’t have to really worry about you know yeah, it’s going to look bad on their quarterly reporting, sure it is. But they can weather the storm. The small mom and pop that has ten or twelve tables, and they’re in there in the morning and they’re working all day and all night and they put in sixteen eighteen hours a day in those restaurants. It’s going to be devastating for them.

Ron

One thing I wanted to back up to just a little bit, because you talked about the freeway, the money’s going to the restaurant right away, and that sounds like that means it’s also going to the driver right away.

Bob

We give the driver their own merchant account also. So the money goes straight to the driver. We don’t have any access to their account. We built some technology with a couple of processors, we actually architecture it and we actually filed a provisional patent on it. When a driver signs up with us now, he goes through a background check. He can sign up with us literally in four or five minutes.

I signed myself up, because I don’t like to tell people you can do it this way, and I’m not a computer guy, my phone is my computer. So when I signed up on the company, I signed up with my phone, I just made sure I had the documents, I took pictures, and all of that stuff. We use this neat software for background check, it’ll actually give us a background check probably in three or four minutes. It uses AI facial recognition and things like that. So it looks at your driver’s license and it says okay, that’s a real face, it’s not a clown face or some other face, it recognizes it.

So we use some pretty good stuff there, and then right after that you get your signup and get your merchant account and it gets issues almost immediately, and then you’re in business.

Ron

So, then the customer orders the food. They pay for it, the delivery fee basically goes from the customer to the driver, rather than just you guys shelling out whatever you want to give.

Bob

Right. It goes directly from the customer to the driver.

Ron

And then the food fee goes directly to the restaurant. And then your two or three dollar delivery fee just goes to you.

Bob

Right

Ron

That is so different.

Bob

Yeah, and it’s so easy. You don’t take a lot of manpower to manage it and do split commissions and I’m sure, I don’t know what the other guys have for systems, I’m sure they’re pretty sophisticated stuff but still, any time you’re trying to manage a bunch of money, it’s laden with cost.

Ron

Oh yeah. That’s an interesting way to do things. There’s something about that too that I think that we just had that whole Prop 22 out in California, with this whole challenge between whether you’re an employee or an independent contractor. We kind of live in this grey area with most of these companies where there’s a lot of stuff that acts like an employee but we’re classified as an independent contractor like we’re running a business, and Prop 22 part of that was to say you can still do that model, but when I look at how you guys have everything structured it really seems much more independent for the driver because you’re actually getting paid by the customer. I guess where I’m going with this is it looks like we’re going to have a new administration that is more labor friendly, especially when it comes to the federal side of things they’re going to be taking a closer look at the gig economy.

I think that this kind of sets you up to be more of an independent contractor or business to business relationship than what the typical model is that’s out there.

Bob

We have no worries in our mind because we really are platform provider. We don’t touch the money. There’s so many things that we don’t do that everyone else does. That was by design day one, we saw this coming even though it was two years ago. The plan was to put the driver as really the owner operator. So he owns and operates his own business. We give him or her the tools to do that. We give them a great platform, we teach them how to do this, we teach them how to do that. But at the end of the day they control all their money. None of it, not a penny, comes to us. We thought that was the best way to handle it.

I think you’re right, I think that there is going to be pressure put on the gig economy because they want to unionize or they want to tax or whatever it may be, and what is really interesting, the drivers themselves don’t want to be employees. The vast majority, you know? So you gotta figure out, how do I balance that as a company like us, how do we balance the things that we could do later down the road as we get bigger and stronger financially, that helps drivers even beyond what they’re doing. We’ve looked at a lot of different programs.

I think that truly the driver wants to be an independent person. He wants to drive on his own schedule and work when he wants. Doesn’t want his money messed with. He wants money when they want their money, they don’t want to work now and then see it tomorrow or the next day, they want to see it now. And that’s why.

Ron

That’s really interesting. And because of the way you’ve got this set up, you allow us to have more skin in the game. Because we not only get our delivery fees, but if we go out and sign up a restaurant, we can earn money based on that. If we get another driver, we can earn money based on that.

Bob

Yep. You have a residual income off the drivers. So that starts at 40%, if you’re just a side hustle, it’s fifty and five. With this new program we’re going to announce tomorrow night, it could go to three levels. So, you could start really turning out some dollars for the drivers themselves. I mean, if you only wanted to get two or three of your friends that are signed up through drivers, you’ll never pay another subscription fee with us.

Ron

And that is one thing that is a little bit different, you do have that subscription fee for drivers. I look at it as it’s almost like a franchise for drivers, in some ways.

Bob

Yeah, it’s a SAAS model but the interesting thing is, if you said the delivery driver’s going to make ten bucks, and it’s $39.99 for 75 rides, and 75 rides generates $750, you paid forty dollars for it. So that’s a pretty good return. You’re not even talking, so it’s like 5% or 4% or something like that. And on the unlimited $99, it’s unlimited rides. If you wanted to do 100 rides, 200 rides, 300 delvieries, whatever you can do.

I’ve seen guys that really made some serious money that drive. When I say serious money, they had over a thousand, 1200, 1500 bucks taken out for their commissions to pay Uber. With us it’s $100. You just put whatever number it is, 7, 8 hundred back in your pocket, and that’s significant. So again, everything on us is based on operating efficiencies, logistic, all that kinda stuff.

Ron

Now you guys right now just got started in Nashville, is that correct?

Bob

Correct

Ron

Now how has gone so far? Have you had enough time to really see any kind of results, keeping the drivers busy, anything like that?

Bob

We’re just getting ramped up. We spent the first three four weeks signing up restaurants. And then, as restaurants are coming on line, getting some orders, we’re monitoring those to make sure that we get there on time, we pick it up, all the things we’re looking for, metrics, to make sure that we don’t have any issues. Then the next step is getting scaled up to make sure we don’t have any issues.

Now right now our platform is running fine. We don’t see any issues, we should be able to scale as quickly as we want in multiple markets at a time. So it’s a matter of getting the referral partners engaged, that’s why we’re doing this call tomorrow night, starting to alert people to here’s the things that are coming on line, these are the things you should be looking forward to, and start really positioning the company.

So, we went from a development technology company but at the end of the day we really are a marketing company. We need to market our business which does a couple of things. It puts more riders in, it puts more drivers to work, it puts more restaurants online.

So, all those people have to have touchpoints from some type of marketing. That’s the next big step with us. I just actually, working with a firm that is really, really good at messaging for what we want to do.  We want to put some humor in our stuff, we don’t want to just be the guy that comes out here and gets your food for you. Put some humor in so you can see a real human touch.

Ron

So how did you choose Nashville? How did Nashville become the choice? It doesn’t sound like maybe the logical choice for somewhere to launch, maybe somewhere more glamorous. I’m not dissing Nashville by any means.

Bob

I know a lot of people thought we’d do Las Vegas or something. You know, one thing I think that we do understand, being in startup mode for forty years plus, you know the hazards of that, the pitfalls, the mistakes you can make. And I tell everybody that you gotta be cautious right now. We don’t need to be pounding our chest. We need to go in, run the business, let’s look at every piece of it, look under the hood, look at the tires filled with air, so the logical choice was to go with a small market. Which was Nashville

But, what you want though, in a small market, you still want some of the pizazz that you get out of a big market. That’s Nashville. They have music, the international, it’s called the IT city. So it made really a lot of sense when we chose Nashville to go there. It’s really controllable. You have Nashville itself and you have some of the other outlying communities within ten or fifteen, twenty miles of around there. So it’s very easy to manage. So that’s why we picked it.

So we don’t need to have a thousand restaurants online to know we’re going to have a problem. You know, get fifty or a hundred online to find a problem. And then go like hell.

Ron

Has that worked out well so far, in being able to fulfill those deliveries? I guess there’s kind of a balance really between getting enough restaurants to order, and getting enough drivers to take care of deliveries.

Bob

Right. And we have that because we’re not overburdened by anything. The next big step is getting the app out there to download for the consumer. And that’s where our marketing will come in at, to basically flood the market. And that’s another reason why we chose a smaller market because we can find out in a small market as much as we can in a big market because we have enough of a controllable on an expense side that we’re not blowing our brains out marketing to get an effective download, right? So it just makes it easier to control for us with the same results with the same information.

Ron

So, I want to get you guys in Denver so we can start delivering here. How do we do that?

Bob

I love Denver. My son actually graduated from the University of Colorado, in Boulder. So Denver is part and parcel of our existence in my business growth, I’ve spent a lot of time in Denver going back believe it or not to the 70’s. I’ve been around.

Ron

It sounds like you kind of give some of us maybe a little bit of power to influence. You mentioned you’ve got your video or your training tomorrow night which will be Thursday night. I’ll put a link in the shownotes everybody, if you listen to this before that call I absolutely encourage you to be a part of it. If not, it’ll point you to the channel for TripDelivers and you can get the replay of it and the replay of some of the coffees with Bob on Saturday mornings. I listened last Saturday morning. You were kind of talking on that call where some people were saying hey, we want you to get started here. Part of that was, well, if we get some restaurants signed up, then that kind of moves somebody up on the list there.

Bob

So the thing is, in a market all it takes is six or seven leaders, and then motivate ten or twelve people, you can sign up five hundred to a thousand restaurants in four to six weeks, and then you’re open for business. At the same time, when we see the momentum building, once we see the marketing side, what the message is going to be and how to do it, then we’ll just plow the ad dollars into the market place.

Our job really is to get the app out there for the end user and customer. What we wanted to was really to get the referral partners, the drivers, it really reinforces that they’re working for themselves, that they’re going to get paid. But if they took the initiative, then they could have multiple revenue streams, one from the recruiting side, one from the  restaurant side, one from the driver side. That’s the way we kind of looked at the business.

You know, there’s some anomalies in the mix but so far the last couple of, last week and this week so far things have been really running pretty smooth. The big thing, biggest thing for us was, could we get a hundred plus menus loaded and I think we’re right at a hundred right now for the Nashville market.

Ron

Yeah, because every time you get a restaurant on, somehow you’ve got to get that information up on the site.

Bob


And the problem with the restaurant menu is, the menu itself is a PDF file so you can’t manipulate it, so it’s harder to get in, and up load it, and then you have to come behind it with a .csv file so we can adjust pricing. What we want to do ultimately is train the restauranteur to manage their own pricing, do all the stuff they need to do. The problem is they are just so darn busy.

Ron

Are there any other cities that are close to coming on line at this point?

Bob

We’re taking a hard look at Atlanta, Houston, maybe Denver now? We’ve got a little traction in Atlanta and a little bit in Houston. The good news in Houston is that Shannon who’s with us, I don’t know if you’ve heard of her but she runs the restaurant side. She knows that market really well, she actually opened that market for Doordash. So she’s going to get with the field and start giving them leads and all that, tell them where to go to. And then she does the training class also and she’s perfect at training.

Ron

And that’s the part that’s just interesting right now. It’s kinda fun just seeing the start of something like this. You kinda wish it would get started a little faster so those of us who are not in markets that are started yet could take advantage of it.

Bob

Oh yeah. You put a group of guys and gals together to go open that market like I said, a half a dozen or dozen, you could open that market in a minute. We’ll just come right behind it, supporting it. But the market, we have in our database right now, we have about a hundred, I think about a hundred sixty main markets. Denver would be a main market. But then we have the submarkets, like Aurora and Lakewood. We have those markets. In our database right now, we have over 3,000 cities. Out of 160 markets and there’s 3,000 submarkets attached to those cities.

Ron

Okay, for getting started like that, especially when you’re getting off the ground in a city, is that better that you kinda get the restaurants that are clustered together?

Bob

Yeah, if you can get clusters, it makes it easier for the driver obviously, right? A guy could work a market, you know he might just want to work only six or seven miles from his house. So if there’s a cluster in there he’ll or she’ll want to work with those markets.

Ron

Well, Bob, I want to thank you. Anything else that you want to bring up or anything else that you can think of, to tell about what you’re doing? Any kind of message you want to leave with drivers or anything like that?

Bob

I would sat this, that one I appreciate you inviting me to talk about Trip. I think that, you know, the drivers, a lot of them aren’t sales people so they’re a little intimidated about asking the restaurant to sign up. So they have to get over that personal fear of rejection which we all have, right?

But I would like to, maybe in a month, as we start ramping up and getting closer to Christmas, maybe just hit me up or I’ll hit you up and I’ll give you an update. You know, here are markets we’re looking at or here’s ones we’re getting ready to open, and then just use this as a platform to communicate with people and let them see what’s going on out there. Because I think once a driver gets involved with us, he’s going to like it or she’s going to like it. They can put more money in their pocket, it’s simple as that.

Same thing with the restaurants. You know I was with these guys on a call today I was telling you about. They were just blown away.

Ron

I know that I just, when I look at some of the driver forums, Facebook groups, different things like that. And you always get some of them with Doordash or they’ll talk about Grubhub as “we” and of course most of the other drivers will just kind of shoot them down and say they’re just acting like an employee. But they’ll say we want to go out and try to spread the word, get more people, get some restaurants involved or get customers involved, cuz that’ll help us stay in business. And there’s some truth to that but at the same time you don’t get rewarded for that with most situations like this. But with what you’re doing, you could really feel like you’re part of this thing.

Bob

Well, yeah, because, you know kind of with all these companies, every company has different leadership styles and what matters to their own internal employees, external, whatever it might be. I’ve always been, I came from a blue collar family, so we all worked. You know the value of working hard and you know the value of your time. If you’re off working and you’re out driving  you’re not with your family. You’ve gotta support them and you’re working your tail off. All these things do matter, from my perspective. We always try to look at the employee first. That’s why every employee in my company has stock options or is a stock owner. Every employee.

Because, at the end of the day, if we do the right thing and the company becomes valuable, then the people that work the hardest are going to get rewarded. That’s no more complicated than that.

Ron

No. That makes sense.

Well, Bob, I want to thank you again for coming on. I’ll put links up in our show notes so that you can see where to go for TripDelivers. Folks, go check out their Youtube channel, if you want to really get into the nitty gritty. They’ve got all their trainings right there on the website that you can just get into, and see how they do stuff. Go in on Thursday night to listen to some of the stuff coming up here or the Saturday morning Coffee with Bob. Thanks again!

Bob.

Okay! Ron, appreciate it. Have a good one.

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