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The Big Picture of Financial Success for Delivery Contractors with Elijah Bilel

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This week on the Deliver on Your Business podcast, we have Elijah Bilel, of the App Lifestyle Youtube channel. Elijah is what you could call the resident Uber Eats expert, succussfully working primarily Uber Eats for a number of years. His channel, originally called the Uber Lifestyle, provides some great tips and tricks for delivering in general and for Uber Eats in specific. In fact, sometime I'd love to have him come back on and talk more about Uber Eats.

Elijah has finished a new book and is just now going through the editing process. As soon as it's up for sale, we'll put the links up for you. His book is entitled “The Anatomy of Financial Success: The Key to Building Financial Confidence and Destroying Financial Insecurity.” He has a lot of insights on money, what it is, how to look at different ways of earning it, and how to use it. We talk to him this week about those insights and how they apply to us in our delivery businesses.

You can listen to the interview on the podcast by clicking on the player, but here is a transcript:

EC

Well, Hey courier nation. Welcome back for another week of the Podcast here, to Deliver on Your Business. And this week I'm really excited to have Elijah Blal on with us. You may know him if you have spent much time looking around on YouTube, you may know him YouTube channel, which is the App Lifestyle. Once upon a time it was the Uber EATS Lifestyle. I ran across him I think way early on, my very first, deliveries were with Uber eats, and when I first started doing deliveries, I, came across some of your training series back then and found just a lot of good practical information that it has. So I'll put a link in the show notes for his channel and everything like that. But, Elijah is coming out with a book as well. He will be launching the book very shortly called the Anatomy of Financial Success. And so we wanted to talk a little bit about that because I think finances is something that we really have to keep an eye on. You know, the focus of what I'm trying to do here is to get you all to focus on the business aspect of what you're doing. The fact is you are running a business and finance is a big part of that. So there's some great stuff that he's got for us.

I've had a chance to look through a draft of his work, a lot of great information, justsome good stuff about money. So I'm looking forward to kind of talking with him a little bit about that. So Elijah, I want to welcome you and thank you for coming onto the podcast. But to Elijah,you're kind of the, I would call you the Uber Eats expert and maybe start off a little bit about how did you get into doing delivery with Uber eats and, and what do you like about working with them?

Elijah:

I appreciate you having me online, Ron. Ironically, I started as a ride share driver for just a regular Uber. So I initially got started when I was involved in a network marketing company and I wanted to subsidize my sales income. And a friend of mine refers to just the ride share version of Uber. I said, yeah, I'll go ahead and give it a try. So I did. It turns out that I actually enjoyed it, so I did it. And Uber kept more or less harassing me from the Uber app saying, Hey, do you want to do deliveries, Hey, do you want to do deliveries? Do you want to do deliveries? And at I said um, no, mainly because before then they didn't have tipping on. You got to be kidding me! And when tipping came out, I was like, okay, I know what, let me take another look at this.

It couldn't hurt and it turns out that when I started doing deliveries, at least in my particular market, you actually make as much, sometimes more just doing Uber eats versus Uber X and I was, blown away, blown away by that. So I would get in the car, turn on my UberEats and sometimes I would just do deliveries only and I literally start comparing the two and as working either less hours or as making more money if I was working the same amount of hours so I came to a choice where I was thinking, okay I've got to pick this window soon because having people and food presents its own challenges. I mean your food smells like Mr. Johns or Popeye's chicken et cetera was like you got to explain, Hey I deliver food and people. Besides, sometimes I wouldn't mind just blasting my music or just listening to audio books. That's one of the reasons I really loved doing Uber Eats is Audio books, audio books. I love listening to audio books, financial audio books, itself. Developments. And I couldn't do that with someone in the back of my car because I don't know if y'all have seen that in High School movie, but here's a Lyft driver in there and when he's running around on the phone talking to people, he has a passenger in the back who's saying, “I'm going to give you a one star” cause he's on the phone. See stuff like that wouldn't pop up with deliveries and you can listen to whatever you want. I said, you know what? I've got to admit this delivery. I like people more but the delivery is actually improving myself cause I can listen to so many audio books. So I decided to stick with delivery.

I was inspired by slim cop, a simple driver who make great videos on ride share.

EC:

I've seen him

Elijah:

There was, at the time literally no channel focusing just on Uber Eats. There were people talking about all the apps like Uber, Doordash, Grubhub. I didn't find any information just on Uber Eats. And based on my experience, I notice that they are kind of missing a few things like the algorithm man, certain things Uber does. I say, you know what, since there's no, there's a void in the marketplace. Honestly, that person that go ahead and start it, because so so many people, I would talk to people who like other drivers were not waiting at restaurants and sell up about all these tips I was finding out. And they literally were genuinely surprised. Like, Oh I didn't know if you did X , Y, Z more pings or you do this, I can increase my tips. Like what drivers need to know about this? I feel kind of obliged to start that YouTube channel. That's where the Uber Eatss courses really came through. So that's kind of the origin of the, of the App Lifestyle. Know before it was called the Uber lifestyle, but I changed it to be the App Lifestyle.

EC:

Yeah, I noticed that there were a lot of people that all of a sudden they, you know, some of the companies were starting to crack down on using their name, some different things like that. So, I don't know if that prompted you to make the change. I saw a few other people had to kind of all around the same time.

Elijah:

You're very right. You're very right.

EC:

You know? And, and to me it doesn't make a whole lot of sense because what you were doing was really, and are continuing to do, really does promote the company and when they kind of force you to take their name out of it, even though you're still talking about them, I think it dilutes some of that promotion that you're able to do for them. But that's just my opinion anyway,

Elijah

That's a good opinion. I guess they don't understand how SEO words.

EC:

Well, no, that's, that's very true. That's very true. And just, just word of mouth and, when you get an organic type of promotion like your channel and different things like that, I would think that these companies would understand that that's just gold for them. But, you know, sometimes there's a lot of things they don't seem to understand. Probably don't have a whole lot of time to get into all those things. But you know, one thing that a wanted to bring up or talk about with that is that in your book, you know, one of the things you really try to get into is talking about developing kind of a well rounded portfolio of income types and you kind of have your income personalities and your different styles of income and trying to spread out so that you're not too heavily depending on just one thing. And that, is that kinda, did that play a part? I'm thinking like getting into YouTube and some different things like that. Cause it sounds like, you know, you mentioned you did rideshare or you're doing some other work for some other things and then Uber eats and then YouTube. Maybe talk about that a little bit.

Elijah

Yeah, that definitely played a role in it. Being a pretty early on I realized that when it comes to income, you've got to have the right expectations. And I've seen so many people throughout the years, they are looking for another way to make money. So they look at all these ways and they just later randomly pick one or they just decide to go with one and then it turned out that they actually either don't like it or they can do it but it's just not paying enough. And when all that comes to close, they spent so much time on that income and now they don't even want it make six months a year, sometimes even years. And they're kind of walking away all mad. Like I put all this energy into this for whatever reason I don't even want it anymore. And that really inspired me to want to share my perspective on income because more important than the income itself is really type, because the type is just a conduit for managing your expectations.

People will say a lot about passive income and it's partly because our society is so focused on get out there and make money. You know, we overemphasize passive income. But if we stopped the thing for a second, let's say if there's no getting out there and get money, you just receiving passive income. What if my friends are going on a vacation. We're going on a yacht and they invited me along, I don't have enough money. I would have it in three months based on just passive income coming in, but I don't have it now. Well, if I have a little wrapped up in active income, I call it permission to be impatient and that's a great example where Uber Eats and Uber comes into play. I can go out there and make that money, get on the yacht with my friends. That's an example of really categorizing the incomes, I go heavily into in the book. That way you can really decide what is it you actually want instead of jumping into something from the pressure at the time, Oh, I just need money. I just need money when, okay, what type of income do I want? How do I want want to make it? You're setting your expectations so you don't select the wrong type. That just doesn't fit what you want or your personality side.

EC:

I like something in your book where you quoted a Robert Kiyosaki and you said that, when you're talking about like let's say doing something like the cruise with your friends or just all sorts of different scenarios, but you had a quote from Robert Kiyosaki where you quoted him as saying that “it is the why that gives you the power to do the how.” And I've always appreciated that kind of approach. And so talk to me a little bit about that cause you talk a little bit about identifying some of your triggers, identifying the kinds of things that really make a difference to you. How can we as drivers, whether we're doing our delivery work or other gig work or even our jobs or passive or activeincome , any kind of income. How can we use that Why to motivate us?

Elijah:

I'm glad you asked. The why is so important. Our society tends to focus very much on the how. And don't get me wrong, that's important. If you look up statistics of people who start their own businesses or even get involved in it, network marketing, There's a huge percentage of people if they don't follow through. And whenever they get involved, often the system is awesome. The how, like how to make the money is laid out in plain print. It couldn't be any more clear, but they still fall off. So I've got to ask myself, why is that. Why is that as literally the words you saying: the why. That's the reason that we all need extra money lists like what we're doing. Uber eats or a ride share, whatever it could be. What gets you in that car? It's going to make it a lot easier when you have a strong why and the why really has two sides. It has a side where you're passionate about something, whatever that may be, might be a passionate about starting your own business, passionate about being able to travel the world and this is your conduit to afford it. And on the other side you also got gotta have something you really don't like about your current circumstance. Like you don't like the fact that you're going walking through the mall and you're forced to window shop instead of saying, Oh, you know what, I want that. Or you might want to get involved in some types of investments but I don't have money. I have limited money. Like there's a bigger behind that is people trying to wait because they say, Oh it's going to make me feel badly. That's a source of power. If it has somewhere to be directed and that's where that why comes in because when you have the why, then you have the how, it could be UberEATS, whatever gig, you can go and put into work, and any time you're tired or just mentally strained or feel like giving up, you just play that mental picture of why in your head, all of a sudden your back to what you're doing full energy.

That's why so many people become wealthy. They have very strong why's. More time to spend with their family, improving the lifestyle of their family as a whole or it doesn't have to be some humanity or family thing. It could just be purely selfish, I just want to be sitting on your butt on the beach sipping Mai Tai's, if that's a strong enough why, as long as you're not hurting anyone, there's nothing wrong with that.

EC:

Well and I think that thatkind of makes a difference too. And you know, and I think the other side of it is that sometimes we can get so caught up in the, and the how that we forget our why. And I think almost as much of a tragedy of not getting anything done, not making any money is to go out there and make the money, but then lose sight of your why and never really accomplish that. So it kind of, you know, you kind of need to use that to create a little bit of balance. I think you said something later on in the book that you said that more money will not solve your financial problems. And in some cases it may put them on full display and make them worse. And there were a couple times like you quoted Dave Ramsey and I always liked a lot of the stuff that Dave Ramsey had to say, like one thing that he would say was similar to that, that sometimes it's that money just kind of has a way of amplifying who you are or exposing you, not so much fixing things. That more money's not going to make you a different person. It's just going to make you more of what you already are. But talk a little bit about just building a foundation because you know, you do a lot of this in your book. I think that's going to be coming out here. I know you've got that schedule to be able to start and going live with that here within the next week or so. Is that correct?

Elijah:

Yes. Actually exactly. One week from today. So next Wednesday.

EC:

Okay. And we'll get a link up for that too. For anybody that wants to get on that book. I really recommend people think about this, but one of the things that you do is you do build a foundation that it's hat you don't just start with the how and the why or well, you don't just start with the how, but you really kind of build a foundation. And, and I think that that ties in very well with this idea that sometimes money makes you more of what you are. So tell us a little bit about your thoughts about, you know, kind of building that foundation before you get the money.

Elijah:

Oh yeah. Most definitely. I mean, the key word is system, system, system, and that's not just a buzzword. If you think of your why and even your how to some degree as the fuel that's really fueling your financial ambitions. But if you don't have a system to make sure everything stays in check, it's either not going to go anywhere or it's going to come from the last name. So in my book I talk about how to build the right system for your money because, when it comes to finances, you want to make sure all your bases are covered. A lot of times, just based on our personality, we'll focus on just a few aspects that we find intriguing, for example, some people love to spend money on themselves and they like to keep up with their bills and those are important, but they may neglect things like investing your money so you can get some of a return, or they may neglect their savings.

You could say to the opposite extreme, someone, they are avid saver. They don't like the fact of just going through life without having any savings. I've got to have funds for a rainy day and they may actually look into investing or something. They hardly ever spend money on themselves and when it comes to between paying bills and investing in something, they'll take the investing. Well, you kind of set yourself up for a quagmire because yeah, you started getting money from your investments, but when your car gets repossessed, who are you going to blame? Okay. All right. And if you don't spend money on yourself, you're gonna start feeling like a slave. Quite literally putting in all this work and not spending any money on yourself. You wonder why you're depressed. So just having a system of being very well grounded, it makes sure all the areas of finance are covered which is very important.

That's something I'm going to go into detail in the book, which is the four points I just mentioned, investing savings, expenses or bills and spending money on yourself, just having those as an integral part of your system is just the groundbreaking experience. And if as long as you make your, you don't drop any of those areas under 5%, what I mean by 5% is you like your annual income. I mean your monthly income, just multiply that times 0.5 and you'll see what 5% is. Make sure none of them drop the low. They act as if you drop a little that and that's when that area is neglecting and you're going to start seeing the negative repercussions and not getting the right potential.

EC

Yeah. And it really, you want to think, I think always want to kind of keep in mind the things that you do need to pay attention to. Like you said, you know, the getting your car repossessed, you know, if you're using your car for delivery, that kind of kills your ability to make money. You know, unless you're a Walker. And there are some markets where people are, like, New York city, probably downtown Chicago, some places like that that people can walk. But most of us need our cars. So, that's something that I talk about this sometimes I call it, you know, I say that our car is like a credit card on wheels cause it's like our biggest expenses is our car. You know, unless you are one of those people can walk or ride your bike. But, you know, it's like we don't think of it as much of an expense because all we think about is the gas, cause that's what's coming out of our pocket right away. But, talk to us a little bit about, I guess trying to, you know, from from a business standpoint and running your business and making sure that you're taking care of your money so that you can operate your business. Um, maybe give us some thoughts on that.

Elijah

Well first off, I do want to say I am not a tax advisor so that's my legal disclaimer. Key thing is to really treat this as a business cause that's ultimately what it is. And that means that the, any money you spend on your business, you need to be keeping an accurate record of it. Checking with it. There's a lot of free resources. You can check this out with Turbo tax. Um, there is another one that escapes my mind but I think it's the Mile IQ app, as well as a lot of tax advisors actually do offer a free consultation but you can just find out exactly what expenses are tax deductible because I've seen people, they don't pay attention to any of this, and they get hit a huge tax bill. As a delivery or ride share driver by rideshare I mean Uber Eatns and not the higher platforms, but specifically delivery. If you're keeping track of your expenses and writing off what you can, you shouldn't be paying that much in taxes. In fact, not to brag but all my years I've been doing Uber eats, I'm always managed to come out owing zero and that all goes down to that record keeping.

But I'm not just recordkeeping, you just want to have a a just a mental meter of how your car is doing. Make sure you're getting your, your tires rotated, your own oil change cause we use it as so much we do need to keep in mind it, things like that which would need to be done on a regular basis anyway. Probably need to be done just a little bit more frequent. And a good habit I have, I know we've loved blasting our music, more power to you you, but maybe just once a week, like on the way home after a shift of doing deliveries, just turn the radio off and just listen to your car. And if you hear anything kind of weird, maybe get it checked out before it becomes some kind of major problems.

EC:

Yeah. Yeah. Cause I mean that's, that's our bread and butter almost kind of literally. And so one thing that I do is like, I figure on about 15 cents a mile is what my overall maintenance cost is going to be once everything goes into, you know, some of it is way down the line, like you know, your tires and different things like that. And so I try and get into a habit of saving 15 cents a mile and then when I've got all those things come up, cause like right now I'm, as we're talking right now I'm charging up my battery cause it's time for a new alternator. But, uh, because of doing that, then at least you know, when, when you think about some of those things like that and you think ahead with your money, then those kinds of things don't knock you for a loop. When all of a sudden it's like, Oh, my tires just went bald. I've been driving, you know, 30,000 miles a year. And who knew that your tires are going to go bald and have to be replaced every 40,000 miles? And so yeah, you want to think about that type of thing.

You talk a lot about orthodox income, you actually have like four different quadrants of income. You've got a, you've got Orthodox versus, I'm trying to remember the other one. It was a Orthodox between kind of an unstandard. Um, what was your term for that?

Elijah:

Oh, there's a Orthodox income and unorthodox.

EC:

And then you had your passive and your active income, maybe talk to us a little bit because there's, there's a lot of us that are doing this it's deliveries. It's full time or maybe it's a side hustle and then we're doing this as part of another job. But there there are a lot of other ways to do income and talk a little bit about some of the different types of income that you can make and how you can maybe use some of what we're doing and delivery is maybe a launchpad and to being able to do more with our money.

Elijah:

Yeah, definitely. You know, the first thing I would say is you always want to have with these two types of income, different types and just like you said, their four quadrants and based on which one you value more in your life, decide on which ones you want to go after. Now you're looking for the ultimate control of your income. You might want to look into getting involved in something that allows you to control how much you make. So it's not a standard, okay, this much money is coming in every single month or even every single week. I want to make my budget around. If you really want to get paid based on how much effort you put in, you want to look into something like a sales, a certain, a certain apps these days that allow you to more or less the sky is the limit. Even on network marketing, if you have that type of personality and going on the more introverted side, there's plenty of tasks you could do in the computer that are freelancing, like the video editing Youtube. Believe it or not, on Youtube, those caches that you see where the subtitles appear when there's closed captions. A lot of people pay a website called rev.com to put those in there, videos to transcribe it and they get paid around like $15 or $20 an hour and it is a freelance work. So it all starts with exactly what do you want. Cause once you know what you want, then you know where to go.

Going on the other side of the spectrum, let's say you're happy with, uh, the amount of work you're putting in, what you do want something on the more passive side. You go, okay, what I want is passive. I don't want to work too hard or I want it to be set up on autopilot. Exactly. What do I want to go after? I'll give you an example would be starting a YouTube channel. Ironically, I mean there is ad revenue off of that. You can get involved in real estate, certain stocks, certain bonds. Now realize I'm not saying each out there to any of this stuff. You would need to invest in your education first, but if those are your ultimate goals, then you know, okay, well this is the starting place so let me go ahead and stop putting, working, knowing what do you got to say? Which one is more important to you? Do I want to control more my income and just have a sky be the limit or do I want to tackle the more passive side?

Now one thing, I think every delivery driver should be doing, and this could be the sky's the limit or passive. We drive around all the time in our vehicles because we're delivering food. I'm sure we see more than our fair share of houses that are for sale by owner. If you find a real estate agent or just a real estate investor and you can find them online or in person, we have referral programs where they'll pay you $500 just to send them a picture of that sign in the home because they have a lead for the business and if the deal goes through, you guys get 500 bucks for it spending maybe five minutes of your time. Yeah, it can just be real passive. But you're doing the background or just time to see it or you get make that a full time thing. Okay. No. When this delivery thing is my side hustle now the objective when I get in my car is to take pictures of those sides so I can get paid.

EC:

Oh yeah. No, that's good idea. I hadn't even thought about that one. Let me ask you for you a, because you've kind of branched into a lot of that. Did you feel like a, your delivery work kind of helps spur you into more of that or was it more like you got into, I think you started with Uber and then moved into Uber eats. Did that kind of come out of, you've already kind of had that mindset a little bit and this was just an end result?

Elijah

Yeah this was, it was the end result. I guess I'm the conspirator if you want to put it in those terms. I definitely use the Uber Eats, somewhat Uber, but moreso Uber Eats as a launching pad for a lot of things I got going because even managing the YouTube channel I would be doing deliveries and be listening to the YouTube channel. I mean YouTube videos while I'm doing it on how to manage the YouTube channel, the results you need to make and how to make money and stuff like this. And sometimes I'll be listening to audio books on financial education and like I said, I couldn't do that with people in the car. One star and when that happens too much to me anymore cause I would be deactivated. Uber Eats really started as a launching pad and a lot of ways, not just directly but also indirectly. I mean there was a time where I actually did just go full time on Uber Eats, and I was able to do that and maintain control of my schedule so I can look up things and schedule certain things. I wouldn't be able to do that if I wasn't doing Uber Eats, just turn the app on when you're ready to make money and you turn it off when you're done. And that's one of the beauties of this gig economy that's been great.

EC:

Yeah. Oh I agree. Do you think that, uh, what do you think there is? I mean w I guess I'm wanting to kind of go two ways with the question here. So maybe I'll just ask both. Um, do you think, what kind of ceiling do you see on what we can earn with Uber eats or any of the delivery platforms? Because I think there is, when you're trading time for money, there is a bit of a ceiling. You know, what kind of ceiling do you see with that? And do you see any of this becoming less attractive over time?

Elijah:

Well, everything has a ceiling and it is gonna vary on your market. So I can only speak for my market. I would say I'm not going to be that person that puts like 60 or 70 hours in. I say to the max, I would go 40 or 50 but for me that's around seven or $800 per week when I'm, as far as where I see the industry going. This is why it's part of the reason that it really inspired me to write the book is that I do know that even though these companies are great, they do control the terms and they can make changes that are unfavorable to drivers at any time. So one thing that y'all got to really brush up on is learning how to find other opportunities that are out there or create other opportunities. So a person I know says this, I don't want to steal their phrase, but he always says have backups to your backups. I would extend it to saying that you want to make sure your bases are covered and not have your sole source of income coming from something that you know directly control. We control, we get online and offline, we don't control the rates, so we want to realize that and really set things up outside of the industry. We'll set things up that are complimentary to what you're doing. A good example is there's a company called wrapify and I've covered them on the App Lifestyle, but you can wrap your car and they'll pay you for miles driven or within a certain area and that's actually passive income because you're already driving out there for delivery, right? So you see how you're still doing what you're doing, but you're increasing your income. Looking at little things like that, you can really make all the difference.

But it starts once you realize, okay, well I want to have an exit plan for this, or I want to have a plan of where this becomes more of a side thing. And then my main thing is really starting to take off. And that could, uh, it doesn't have to strictly entrepreneurship, it could be you getting a trade and becoming educated, then you have more value to break into the marketplace. So you can become a freelancer necessarily or get a high paying job and you might hop in and do deliveries because you want some extra money. So you're engaged and you want to save that money to get the engagement ring, hop in Uber Eats and get them money and hop out. You can do it like that, but you gotta have a game plan. All that. If you don't, you're just going to keep driving and the driving. And then let's say the companies make a change not in our favor and ti's like, oh man, this is, I don't like it. It won't be as big of a deal if you do have other things set up or if you're setting up things that are leaks.

EC:

Yeah. And folks. One thing I will tell you to do is if you didn't notice it, back up a few minutes. Go back and re listen if you didn't catch Elijah talking about this, about what he's doing when he's driving around: He's talking about listening to the audio books and you know, learning and, and listen to YouTube channels. And, and I think that's, that's, that's a big thing. I always like to say that this is kinda like the, this can really be a gateway drug for a lot of us, we're kind of accidental entrepreneurs, you know, and maybe didn't plan to run a business, but there are a lot of elements of it that are part of that. And I'm hoping that it can kind of become, for a lot of us, maybe something that inspires us to want to go well beyond something that involves trading time for money and, and things like this. I really like what you said about just taking your time. We've got all sorts of time in the car. So, you know, take that time and learn and find where you want to go next and start preparing for that because guys, you're getting paid to learn. That's kinda one of those not as easily measurable things like you said, you get paid if you do Wrapify, you get paid some money for having that advertising on your car while you're driving around. But there's another way that you're getting paid and that's just that, that time that you get and when you can use that to learn, it's kinda like you're paying yourself. Are there any other bits of advice that you would like to leave us with a, as we wrap up here today?

Elijah:

I'd wrap up by re-emphasizing what you said a really taking advantage of that time that you're having in the car, in a educating yourself on, it can be a new trade you want to learn or particular skillset. I actually have a video on my YouTube channel and it was a pun, but the videos entitled “Let Uber Eats pay for your education.” Obviously is not like it's in an admissions sense, but it is technically happening if you do it that way. And what you said about this being kind of a gateway to going on to newer things I definitely agree because before I, the first thing I did is in terms of making money actually was a solo business that I did. It was called Indigenous Remedies, where I sold herbal capsules, herbal teas. And I have figured a lot of these about business from that venture. And when I started doing these apps on this, the first thing I thought about was know what? This is actually a great entry point for anyone who wants to do anything. This is like you are like, it doesn't have all the elements of me. But one thing it does have what if you want to make more money and keep some of the money, but you gotta be analytical. You gotta look at how much you're making and find little ways you can make additional money and finding ways to make sure you keep that money and not give credit to the IRS so much. And those are skillsets that they're very heavily involved in business and you're kind of learning them right here. So you spend at least six months to a year just in one this type of business, you're actually pretty well equipped already to go and either start something on your own or get involved with something. It's an excellent learning experience just in itself, and that's coming out of, you know what we just talked about.

EC:

Yeah. Because all of a sudden you come out of this and it's not like a job where it's kind of like okay I just went out and I did some work or whatever cause now you've come out of it and you've had to deal with business taxes. You've had to deal with all sorts of things like setting your schedule, which is really market research and, and there's so much that what we do just gives you some skills that you can build on those. And you can do so much more from that.

Elijah, I want to thank you again for coming on being with us today and folks, I definitely encourage you, as soon as we've got, as soon as that comes out, I'll put links up so that she can check out his book. It's called the Anatomy of Financial Success. Cause that's a huge part of what we do is just understand the money. I think the better you understand the money, the better you get with everything else that you're doing. So folks, thanks again for stopping in and Elijah, thank you very much.

Elijah:

I'm glad you had me. I would just say a be safe out there and stay profitable.

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